Module 6-05 Penalties applicable for minor and adult (Laws)

7 min read

If your high school or college son or daughter calls you and says they’ve arrested for DUI or DWI, your initial reaction may be fear; then, you might throw in some anger and settle on worry. You know that an arrest for driving under the influence (“DUI”) isn’t a good thing. But what are the practical consequences? And was that an arrest for DUI? Or was it DWI?

First, it’s important to understand what a DUI is in Texas and how it differs from DWI. Many states across the country use DUI and DWI interchangeably, but Texas does not. Texas is a DWI state, and our legislation refers to “driving while intoxicated.” However, Texas law has a special “DUI” statute related to minors who drive under the influence of alcohol.

WHAT IS DWI?

In Texas, an individual is driving while intoxicated if either:

  • A blood alcohol test (BAC) shows a blood alcohol level of .08% or higher; or
  • The driver is impaired.

A driver is impaired if they don’t have the use of their normal mental or physical faculties due to any amount of alcohol or drug consumption. This “impairment” factor means that police can arrest a driver for DWI even with a BAC below the legal limit. The legal BAC limit is even lower for commercial drivers

However, it’s important to remember that BAC tests are not always accurate and that determining whether a driver is impaired is largely up to the arresting officer’s judgment. An experienced DWI defense attorney can help.

WHAT IS DUI?

In Texas, Driving under the influence of alcohol known as “DUI” or “DUIA,” is a charge reserved for minors under the age of 21. Because it is illegal for anyone under 21 to consume alcohol, the .08% legal blood alcohol limit of a DWI does not apply to minors; Texas is a “no tolerance” state. When a minor is driving while under the influence of any detectable amount of alcohol, police can charge them with a DUI:

“A minor commits an offense if the minor operates a motor vehicle in a public place, or a watercraft, while having any detectable amount of alcohol in the minor’s system.”

See Tex. Penal Code. § 106.041 (2009). However, police can charge minors with both DWI and DUI for driving while intoxicated.

POTENTIAL DWI PENALTIES FOR MINORS

Potential penalties for a DWI conviction are the same for minors and adults and can include both fines and jail time. Aggravating circumstances, such as driving with an open container, having a BAC over 0.15 % , driving intoxicated with a minor in the car, seriously injuring or killing someone, can increase the severity of the charge and the possible penalties.

1st Offense:

A first DWI conviction is a Class B misdemeanor. Penalties include:

  1. A fine of up to $2,000.
  2. Jail for a minimum of 72 hours and up to 180 days.
  3. A driver’s license suspension.

For a first conviction, the license suspension will be for a minimum of 90 days and up to one year.

2nd Offense:

A second DWI conviction is a Class A misdemeanor. Penalties include:

  1. A fine of up to $4,000.
  2. Jail for a minimum of 30 days and up to one year.
  3. A license suspension of 180 days to two years.

3rd or Subsequent Offense:

A third or subsequent conviction for DWI is a third-degree felony. Penalties include:

  1. A fine of up to $10,000.
  2. Prison for a minimum of two years and up to ten years.
  3. A license suspension for 180 days to two years.

Intoxication Assault:

If a driver seriously injures someone while intoxicated, a conviction for intoxication assault is a third-degree felony, regardless of whether the driver has any prior DWI convictions. Penalties include a fine of up to $10,000, prison for a minimum of two years and up to ten years, and license suspension for 180 days to two years.

Intoxication Manslaughter:

If an intoxicated driver kills someone, a conviction for intoxication manslaughter is a second-degree felony. Penalties include: (1) a fine of up to $10,000, (2) prison for two to 20 years, and (3) license suspension for 180 days to two years.

Texas also recently added mandatory amounts to the fines you can receive for a DWI, including:

  • $3,000 for the first DWI in 36 months;
  • $4,500 for any subsequent DWI in 36 months; and
  • $6,000 for a BAC of .15% or higher.

POTENTIAL DUI PENALTIES FOR MINORS

For children under 17 years old, the penalties and charges for suspected DUI  vary from DWI penalties. The severity of penalties for a guilty DUI conviction can vary based on the minor’s age and driving record.

1st Offense Under 17:

For minors under 17, a first DUI conviction is a Class C misdemeanor. Possible penalties include 20 to 40 hours of mandatory community service, a fine of up to $500, up to a 60-day license suspension, and a mandatory alcohol education class. For minors under 18, the court may require parents to attend the class with their child.

1st Offense Ages 17 to 20:

A first DUI in Texas is a Class B misdemeanor for minors between 17 and 20 of age. Penalties include up to $2,000 in fines, 72 hours to 180 days in jail for older minors, and a one-year license suspension.

2nd Offense:

A second DUI offense is a Class C misdemeanor. Penalties include up to a $500 fine, 40 to 60 hours of mandatory community service, a license suspension from 180 days to two years, and an alcohol education class.

3rd Offense

Texas law classifies a third DUI offense as “Delinquent Conduct by a Minor.” Penalties include up to a $500 fine, 40 to 60 hours of mandatory community services, and a license suspension of 180 days to two years.

IMPLIED CONSENT TO BLOOD ALCOHOL TESTING

If you drive a car in Texas, you give  implied consent to testing for drugs or alcohol. If the police stop your minor child for suspected DWI or DUI, the police can ask them to consent to a breath or blood test even if you are not present. This “implied consent” rule doesn’t mean that your minor child doesn’t have a choice; the police can only compel a chemical test in specific circumstances. But if they refuse, the state can automatically suspend their driver’s license for a set period:

  • 1st Refusal: 180-day license suspension
  • 2nd or Subsequent Refusal: two-year license suspension

If your child refuses to provide a specimen, the police can also place them in jail until they post a bond or appear before a magistrate or juvenile judge.

If your child refuses a breath or blood test, the police will also typically seek a warrant from a judge for a blood test. To obtain a warrant, the police need to show  probable, including why they believe the officer believes your child is intoxicated and provide enough evidence to convince the court that it is reasonable to assume intoxication.

Implied Consent Laws for Adults 

Implied consent for adults is similar to that for minors. 

Like the minor, an adult implies consent to the collection of one or more breath or blood samples for analysis if he or she is arrested for driving a motor vehicle or boat in a public place while intoxicated, or if he or she is a adult under 21 years of age. and there is a detectable or perceivable amount of alcohol in your system while operating a motor vehicle in a public place as deemed by an officer. The breath or blood sample determines if alcohol is present in your body and will identify the amount of alcohol in your system, as well as the presence of any other controlled substances or drugs. 

A person who refuses to provide a blood or breath sample for analysis will have their driver's license suspended for 180 days or up to 730 days for subsequent violations. If a person submits to a blood or breath sample and the results show a BAC of 0.08 or higher, their driver's license can be suspended for 90 days or up to 365 days for subsequent violations. Anyone with a BAC of 0.08 or more is considered intoxicated

Penalties for DWI and DUI of Alcohol or Drug- Adults